What’s in a Name?

We were looking for inspiration for our product names that reflected the essence of Silver Lining, names that would mean something more than just a cut, style or color tone. We wanted names that could teach, if that’s not too much to ask. So in that light we’ve decided to name each SL garment after a famous artist: painter, singer, writer or dancer.

The Fitzgerald Trench

Ella

Ella Fitzgerald was the “First Lady of Song”, an accomplished American Jazz vocalist who performed during the height of her career in the 1940’s and 50’s.  Her voice is as unique and unmistakable as a bolt of lightning that somehow strikes softly with an intense power.

The Woolf Field Coat

Virginia Woolf was an English modernist novelist who became prominent during the period of relative peace between the two world wars. She wrote: “Masterpieces are not single and solitary births; they are the outcome of many years of thinking in common, of thinking by the body of the people, so that the experience of the mass is behind the single voice.”

 

The Kahlo Leather Fold-Over Clutch

The Bourgie Leather Side-Zip Satchel

Frida Kahlo was a Mexican Painter best known for her haunting self portraits that she created in the early 20th century.  Her work often portrayed literal depictions of her raw emotions and inner struggles.  She once said:  “Nothing is worth more than laughter. It is strength to laugh and to abandon oneself, to be light. Tragedy is the most ridiculous thing.”

Photo: Sipa Press

Photo: Sipa Press

"Maman," at the Tate Modern, London 2007

"Maman," at the Tate Modern, London 2007

“I have been to Hell and back and let me tell you it was wonderful.” Louise Bourgeois, was a French-American contemporary abstract sculptor nicknamed “the Spiderwoman” for her massive spider sculptures that embody the themes of spinning, weaving, nurture and protection. “The spider is a repairer. If you bash into the web of a spider, she doesn't get mad. She weaves and repairs it.”

The Carline Field Coat

Richard Carline, "Pattern of French Fields behind Front Lines," July 1918

Richard Carline,
"Pattern of French Fields behind Front Lines," July 1918

Richard Carline, "Mount Hermon and Mount Sannin above the Clouds," 1920

Richard Carline, "Mount Hermon and Mount Sannin above the Clouds," 1920

Sydney Carline, "Flying Above Kirkuk," 1919

Sydney Carline, "Flying Above Kirkuk," 1919

Sydney and Richard Carline were brothers employed as official British military artists during the First World War, documenting aerial combat. Between 1918-1920, the brothers produced dozens of artworks recording views over the Western Front, the Italian Front and the Middle East.  Capturing these landscapes in both their peaceful grandeur and heat of battle from the perspective of an airplane was particularly novel at the time.

 

 

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